Cheyenne Botanic Gardens : Gardening Tips


Hanging houseplant for low light areas

Devil’s ivy or pothos is a popular foliage houseplant. It has heart shaped leaves that vine orpothos Hanging houseplant for low light areas trail far out of the pot. It often has variegated leaves with splotches of yellow or white. It needs bright but not direct light. Grow pothos on the wet side in summer and drier in winter. Pinching the tips encourages bushiness. Regular fertilization will encourage robust growth. Devil’s ivy is easy to grow and relatively free of pests.
It is great for office cubicles or low light rooms.

New USDA Plant Zone Map Released

At long last there is a new USDA plant hardiness zone map.

This guide was last updated in 1990 and was long overdue for a revamping to take into account climatic changes. These planting maps are based primarily upon average minimum temperatures. There are a total of 13 zones. 1 is coldest (-60 to –50). 13 is hottest (60 to 70) and is found only on Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

The new map can be found on the USDA website. It uses 30 years of weather data gathered from 1976 to 2005. It is more precise than the 1990 version, showing It is designed for the Web and using their zip codes you see your zone down to half-​​mile segments. Many areas now find themselves in warmer zones28 hardy usjpg 257b33cfe73a00f0 New USDA Plant Zone Map Released

Cheyenne is now in a new climate zone.

Cheyenne used to be solidly in zone 4 is now one full zone warmer, zone 5.
Because this map is mostly based upon temperature,  it doesn’t account for Cheyenne’s extreme winds and lack of winter snow cover. Therefore, I would caution people to not jump blindly into growing zone 5 plants and instead look at what is proven to do well here,” said Cheyenne Botanic Gardens Director Shane Smith. Cheyenne gardeners should instead stick to following the colder, zone 4 designation especially when selecting trees and shrubs, stated Smith.

 

Shelterbelts for slowing the wind

Shelterbelt History

German immigrants brought the idea of planting to the New World that were very appropriate for their windy prairie settlements. However, they didn’t become popular until the 1930s dust bowl when farmers and ranchers were encouraged to establish shelterbelts throughout the Great Plains region to prevent wind erosion.

Benefits

Shelterbelts not only provide much needed crop protection, but also provide other positive benefits to the people and animals that dwell around them.

Plant your own

shelterbelt1 250x187 Shelterbelts for slowing the windVisit the shelterbelt demonstration in the Rotary Century Plazas on the grounds of the Cheyenne Botanic Garden.

Also visit the Laramie County Conservation District for great local information.
This link
shows some good examples of designing a shelterbelt.

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