Monthly Archives: March 2014

A new old way to schedule planting

Check out this handout on how to use indicator plants to schedule your outside plantings. Click here for our phenology planting schedule

No need to spray Beetles

City and State Foresters are now saying that there is no need to continue to spray for pine beetles. Click here to view recent article in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle. The reasons for the lower population of beetles is speculative. Some believe it could simply be because the beetles have done such a good job of killing pine trees, that there aren’t many susceptible pines left for them to sustain a high population. The damage from pine beetles has been more severe in Cheyenne than in the other front range communities. However, some of the worst pine beetle damage can be found in Colorado’s Roosevelt National Forest in Larimer County.

The good news is for now, homeowners can save a lot of money by not having to spray EmeraldAshBorer No need to spray Beetlestheir trees. In the meantime, foresters in cities up and down the Front Range are weary about a new severe threat: the Emerald Ash Borer, which has recently taken up residence in Boulder County. The emerald ash borer has been marching across the (more…)

Dwarf Iris time

What’s blooming right now in Cheyenne? Dwarf irises!IrisRet2 Dwarf Iris time

These dwarf irises come every year with little care and they each year they come back more plentiful than before. They bloom through the unpredictable weather of spring and do fine in the snow and cold of early to late March. They can be planted in a lawn (even dandelion killer won’t hurt them) or a in bed. These dwarf iris go by the fancy name of “Iris reticulata,” for the bluish/​purple ones and “Iris danfordiae,” for the yellow ones.  They’re among the first to bring color to the garden at the beginning of spring.

They come from small bulbs planted in late summer or early fall and you can often find them sold as a mixture of yellow, blue, dark purple and light blue. Look closely at the bluish shades and you’ll see an intricate little pattern that attracts bees like a lit airplane runway.

Snowdrops blooming in Cheyenne

snowdrop2 250x161 Snowdrops blooming in Cheyenne

Snowdrop blooming outside in Cheyenne February – March

If you had planted the bulb, ‘snow drop,’ in a sunny spot in your yard. You would have blooms today.

The snowdrop flower that comes from a small bulb is always the first flower to bloom in High Plains gardens (usually you see the first flower in mid-​​February through early March), even under a blanket of snow. While it is quite small, looking like three drops of milk hanging from a stem, it does wonders for the spirit when it blooms in the snow. It’s Latin name is appropriately “Galanthus” which means “milk-​​white flowers.”

These are not common bulbs to find but most good garden centers will carry snowdrops.  They are also readily available via mail order. They are commonly sold in the Fall and should be planted prior to winter setting in. Make a note on your calendar now for to purchase them in late September. They bloom best and earliest in a sunny location.

The next flower to bloom in Cheyenne will be the early dwarf Iris reticulata (blue) and Iris danfordiae (yellow).